A Lost Generation

I am reading Anne Frank's "The Diary of a Young Girl" and I must say that though it was a tedious read (it's a diary, after all), I think it is a gem.




History through the eyes of someone the same age as my students.

And if it takes a war to come up with a masterpiece like this. I wouldn't mind another war.




I wouldn't mind another war just for the kids today to realize that they are totally fine.
Don't shoot me for saying what I just said.

I always wondered how my students would react if they were put into a situation like Anne. Would they write a diary? Would they study while in hiding? Would they still flirt? Or would they still whine and complain that things are not going their way? I always thought that my students are sheltered spoiled brats that even if they already have all the material things their parents could provide them, still, they are angry.  These children leave the school without their parents and they come home without their parents. They only have their parents' mobile number or Yahoo messenger account, which are poor substitute for flesh and blood parents. These children do not have any direction at all. They're just screaming for help, their angst are their unshed tears, their rowdiness are their imploded frustrations, and they are angry. They are bored, and they do not know what to do with their lives.

But still, I wonder how they would react if we are living in a war. Would a war change their perspective? Would it make them realize that what they're whining about do not even measure up to the sufferings of children who experienced wars?

This generation is a lost generation, and if we need a war to shake these children up into responsibility and discipline. Then let it be.

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